MACGREGOR 26

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HOT NEWS:   After 58 years of production, and 38,000 sailboats, the MacGregors are retiring.  Production of the MacGregor 26 has been discontinued.   Our daughter and son in law, Laura and Paul Sharp, have opened a new boat building business in Stuart, Florida, and are manufacturing a boat similar to our MacGregor 26.        Contact them at  tattooyachts.com 

 

 

For all of the details about our retirement, and for the full MacGregor 26 website, click here.

 

 

Hall of Fame Award

On January 20, 2000, the MacGregor 25 was one of two boats inducted into the Sail America Hall of Fame

The award was presented at the Atlantic City Sail Expo

Roger MacGregor with the MacGregor 25 model that will be displayed at the American Sailboat Hall of Fame Museum

 in Newport, Rhode Island

Two boats each year are inducted into the Hall of Fame.   The standard by which they are selected is shown below:

A boat that has earned lasting recognition by fostering new

enjoyment and growth in the sport of sailing through excellent design

Guided by this standard, Sail America has selected 18 boats for induction into the American Sailboat Hall of Fame since its founding in 1994. These Hall of Fame boats are true American classics, exemplars of the extraordinary skill and ingenuity of American boat builders. They range in size from 8 to 41 feet. Several date to the dawn of the fiberglass era and are considered collectorís items, others are still in production, selling briskly. All have profoundly influenced the sport of sailing. By their sheer excellence, they have made sailing better.

Selections for the Hall of Fame were made by a committee of magazine editors comprised of Bill Schanen, Sailing Magazine chairman; John Burnham, Sailing World Magazine and Patience Wales, Sail Magazine. Half-models of Hall of Fame boats are displayed each year at Sail Expo, and are on permanent display at the Museum of Yachting in Newport, Rhode Island.

The MacGregor 25

Henry Ford is often credited with bringing the automobile to the common man. Roger MacGregor, a one-time Ford employee, may well be credited with doing the same thing for the cruising sailboat. The popular MacGregor 25 was the flagship of his line for 14 years. With a swinging keel - a MacGregor invention - that made transporting and launching the boat a snap, and a price that hovered around the cost of a new car, the MacGregor 25 opened up coastal and inland sailing to countless thousands of people who might have otherwise remained ashore.

MacGregor started the company while earning his MBA at Stanford Business School. He and his wife, MaryLou, later ran the company out of their garage while Roger was working for Ford. Soon, though, the business outgrew the garage, and MacGregor quit his job, bought some property in Costa Mesa, and started building a plant that now encompasses 65,000 square feet. While the company now has over 100 employees, and sells its boats in 15 countries, the business is still family run. Itís one of the U.S.ís most successful boatbuilding outfits.

The 25 wasnít the first boat MacGregor build-that honor belongs to the Venture 21. But itís the one that seemed to do the best job serving the growing pocket cruiser market. It had enough space to house a couple or small family for a weekend, yet could easily be towed behind most cars.

Before the 25 debuted, many boat designers didnít think it was feasible to squeeze a serviceable cruising interior into a boat of that size. While its functional lines, lightweight design and minimal use of wood both above and below decks may not have won the approval of some sailing purists when it debuted in 1973, the flexible, go-anywhere boat proved to be extremely successful. It was easy to rig-one person could step the mast-and sail and was especially popular with first-time sailboat owners.

When the 25ís production run ended in 1987, 7,000 had been sold.

                                                                                                                                -Stuart Streuli, Sailing World

Note:  The other boat inducted into the Hall of Fame was the Freedom 40.