MACGREGOR 26

 SITE MAP

HOME PAGE

PHOTO GALLERY

CONTACT US

BROCHURE

INSTRUCTION MANUAL

VIDEOS

BOAT DRAWINGS

SPECIFICATIONS

INTERIOR

WATER BALLAST

HARDWARE

COCKPIT

CONSTRUCTION

TRAILERING

ALUMINUM TRAILER

LAUNCHING

MAST RAISING

SAILING PERFORMANCE

POWER, WATERSKI

SPINNAKER

SAFETY

EASY TO SAIL

HOW TO SAIL

WHY THE LOW PRICE

COST TO OWN

COMPARE 26X

COMPARE HUNTER EDGE

COMPANY HISTORY

HALL OF FAME AWARD

WHY BUY A SAILBOAT

MAGAZINE REVIEWS

SUPPLIERS' CORNER

SHIPPING

EXPORTING

FACTORY GARAGE SALE

MACGREGOR 65

MACGREGOR 70 ANTHEM

 

 

 

 

HOT NEWS:   After 58 years of production, and 38,000 sailboats, the MacGregors are retiring.  Production of the MacGregor 26 has been discontinued.   Our daughter and son in law, Laura and Paul Sharp, have opened a new boat building business in Stuart, Florida, and are manufacturing a boat similar to our MacGregor 26.        Contact them at  tattooyachts.com 

 

 

For all of the details about our retirement, and for the full MacGregor 26 website, click here.

 

 

 
WHY THE LOW PRICE FOR A MACGREGOR 26
 
 
 
As you have probably noticed, the price for the MacGregor 26 is considerably less than the price of boats of comparable size. The reasons are many.
 
The design is simple and straightforward, the hallmark of sound engineering.
 
MacGregor is one of the largest, highest volume sailboat manufacturers in the world. These boats are built in one of the most modern and efficient plants in the industry. We have specialized in this market for over 25 years, and have built over 35,000 boats.
 
This volume production has many cost advantages. Overhead and development costs are spread over a large number of boats. We buy the same or better materials than other builders, but we buy for a lot less because of our higher volume. For example, we buy resin by the tank car, whereas most builders purchase by the barrel. Our prices can be 30% to 40% less for the same material. We, like most successful companies in aircraft, cars and virtually everything else, do our own design work. We know our manufacturing capabilities better than an outside designer. Many designers spend very little time in production plants, and tend to create boats that are extremely costly to build.
 
Our work force is highly specialized. Because of our volume, each worker can concentrate on one job and he soon becomes the best in the industry at that job. Unlike most sailboat builders, we make large investments in manufacturing engineering---the art of creating production systems that are labor saving and foolproof. We build jigs, fixtures and other tooling that allows the worker to do his job with a minimum of effort and a maximum of accuracy.
 
Every tidbit of knowledge permanently transferred to tooling or equipment lowers the requirement for high paid labor. The results are accuracy and low cost. Don't overlook the fact that water ballast is free. Lead and cast iron cost big money.
 
Computers have helped us control cost. Advanced computer modeling is used in all phases of design work; to create the boat itself and to prepare patterns and precise shop drawings that spell out every detail of the boat and its production. We have created our own specialized software for production scheduling, purchasing, inventory control, cost control, payroll, and structural analysis.
 
Most of our competitors build many types of boats of varying sizes, and their skills are spread too widely, preventing them from really optimizing the design and production of any one model. We do no custom work. We build only the configuration shown in this brochure. Basically, we do just one thing, and we do it well.
 
Donít be taken in by the old adage "you get what you pay for". It is often the inefficient builder's rationalization for his higher prices. Be sure that "what you pay for" is not a builder's high overhead, excessive advertising expenditures, equipment that you do not want or need, unnecessarily complex designs, poor inventory control, lack of well engineered production tooling, or a wide range of other wasteful business or manufacturing practices. These are of no value to you, but their costs are invariably passed on to you in the form of higher prices.